• Park only in well-lit areas at night. Check for strangers who might be “casing” the area before you exit or enter your car.
  • Valuables should be kept in the trunk, locked glove compartment, or out of sight whenever traveling or leaving a vehicle parked.
  • Avoid fumbling for your keys; have them in your hand as you approach your car.
  • Always check the back seat for uninvited guests before getting inside.
  • Have your vehicle serviced before long trips.
  • Carry traveler’s checks instead of large amounts of cash.
  • Keep enough gas in the tank so you won’t get stranded.
  • Keep all doors locked and windows rolled up most of the way.
  • Stay on well-traveled, well-lit roads.
  • Preplan route of travel and notify someone of plan and arrival times.
  • Try to avoid late night driving.
  • If you must travel at night regularly, don’t carry more than you can afford to lose. One suggestion is to carry a second wallet containing a few $1.00 bills and old credit cards, which are normally destroyed or discarded. If confronted at knife or gunpoint, give the suspect the second wallet and concentrate on a good physical description to give to the police.
  • Do not stop to assist stranded motorists.
  • Call for help at the nearest phone – noting milepost.
  • If you are being followed by another car, drive into an open gas station, stay in your car, and ask the attendant to call the police. Better yet, drive straight to the nearest police station for assistance.
  • If you are “rear-ended” by another vehicle, motion for the driver to follow you to a public place.
  • “Bump and rob” artists stage such incidents to lure unsuspecting drivers out of their cars to rob them of their wallet or purse. Drive to the nearest public place.  If a driver won’t follow you, obtain as thorough a description as you can and report the incident to the police.
  • If your car breaks down, seek a phone or call box only if it is safe to do so. Place a “Call Police” banner in your rear window and raise the hood. If a “good Samaritan” approaches, crack a window and ask them to call the police or your tow company.
  • If someone suspicious approaches your vehicle at a red light or stop sign, blow the horn.
  • Do not pull over for flashing headlights. An emergency or police vehicle has blue or red and blue flashing lights.
  • If you become lost, find a public place, like a service station, to read your map or ask for directions.
  • If you are told that something is wrong with your vehicle, do not stop immediately. Drive to the nearest service station or another well-lighted public area.
  • If using an automatic teller machine, be sure the area is well lit. Count your money inside your locked vehicle with the windows up.

 

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